Wednesday, March 9, 2011

baking bread--who knew it could be so easy

So I've really gotten into baking bread lately. Before you become impressed you need to know that I cheap...a lot...when I make it. My bread machine has been working overtime on both dough and bread. I got inspired a little over a month ago when I was visiting Iowa. I have a few friends out there who bake their own bread. I mean really make it themselves. They do not use bread machines and would probably not even call what I do baking bread. But it works for me and my family loves it. A couple of things I have discovered in the process of trying new recipes. 1. It really isn't that hard. For some reason I always thought making bread was a difficult tedious task. 2. The ingredients really do not vary much between the different types of bread. The biggest difference in the different types of bread is the amount of the ingredients and the rise times.

Right now I've got sour dough bread (My first attempt at this...we will see how it goes) baking and some focaccia bread baking. There is chicken on my stove top and we are going to have paninis for supper. I have to share this recipe that my sister-in-law Kristen passed onto me for the focaccia bread. Yummy and super, super easy. You don't even need a bread machine or much time to make it (the time factor is super important to me as I decide which bread recipes to try). Here's the link: http://www.kingarthurflour.com/recipes/blitz-bread-no-fuss-focaccia-recipe. I'm actually making my second one for the day because Nathan, Joe & I ate through half the first one at lunch. I'll have to share my artisan bread recipe with you the next post. It, too, is easy and you can make a batch to last you all week. Imagine have fresh bread for supper every night...

1 comment:

Jerry Cline said...

Karen,
I've just gotten Jim Lahey's book, my bread, the revolutionary no-work, no knead method. He has one basic recipe too and from there one can go in a lot of different directions. I have a bowl of dough rising on the top shelf of my bookcases here in my office. It will rise for 18 hours, then I'll cook it in a Dutch oven either in the oven or on the Big Green Egg on the back porch. This is my first attempt at this process. We used to have a machine in IN and I often took loaves of bread with me on pastoral visits. A bit misunderstood at first ("Why is he doing this?") but I got away from the machine when I started having problems getting the bread out of the pan. Anyway, I had to comment... God bless,